How to pressure can carrots with a step by step video

This post was most recently updated on June 29th, 2020

If you have a bumper carrot harvest, you might be wondering how to pressure carrots. Here is my step by step guide to canning carrots with a pressure canner and it even includes a video!

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If you are wanting to preserve low acid foods like vegetables or meat, you will need a pressure canner if you want to keep them unrefrigerated. 

There are many ways to preserve foods, these include:

Carrots lend themselves to most of these methods, and each of them have positives and negatives.

I like to can carrots because of the following reasons:

  • You can use them as they are, just heat them through (or not)
  • They don’t go rubbery
  • They don’t take up room in your fridge/freezer or garden
  • They don’t get frost burn
  • They look pretty!

 

How to pressure can carrots – the raw pack method

There are a few things you will need:

  • Carrots – unblemished and fresh
  • Canning jars
  • New seals
  • Screw bands that fit the jars
  • Pressure canner and jar rack
  • Jar lifter

I like to raw pack my carrots as it is faster to skip out the cooking them step and it is less effort as you don’t need to heat the jars and water and it reduces the risk of burning yourself.

1. Wash the carrots

Carrots fresh from the garden are best to use. Give them a good scrub and remove any spots or cracks.

2. Cut the carrots

You can decide if you want your carrots sliced or in chunks. Small carrots I tend to leave whole.

3. Pack the carrots in to your canning jars

Pack them in as tightly as you can as they will collapse down slightly once they are cooked.

4. Top with water

Fill the jars allowing 1 inch of head space – the gap at the top. Run a knife around the edge of the jar and release any air bubbles and re-top up with water if required to keep that 1 inch headspace. You might choose to add salt now at the rate of 1/2 teaspoon for a 500ml/pint jar and 1 teaspoon for a 1 liter/1 quart jar.

5. Add the seals and bands

Wipe the rims of the jars, checking for any chips or cracks in both the edge of the jars and on the seals. Damaged jars or damaged seals won’t work. 

Screw down the bands with just your fingertips until it is tight.

6. Add water to your canner

Follow your pressure canners directions and add as much water as it suggests. I add 4 liters/quarts to my 23 quart canner.

Place your canner on the cook top and add your jars on top of the rack.

7. Seal on your lid and put on high

Check that your canner lid is in good shape, ensure none of the seals are cracked or need replaced. Place your lid on properly but with the rocker off. Set your canner on high and bring to a boil.

8. Vent for 10 minutes

Once your pot is boiling and there is a constant stream of steam coming out the vent set your timer for 10 minutes.

9. Place your rocker

After 10 minutes place your rocker on and allow the pressure to build.

If you live under 1000ft/303m altitude then you are aiming for 11psi, if you live above this you will have to aim for 15psi, follow your canners directions for altitude adjustments.

10. Set your timer

Once pressure is reached set your timer again – 25 minutes for smaller jars and 30 minutes for the larger jars. Try to keep the pressure at the set amount, for my oven that means I have to turn my cooktop down to halfway.

11. Turn off and walk away

Once your timer goes off, turn your cooktop off and walk away. This allows the pressure to normalise slowly as the temperature declines. If you rush this process you will end up with failed seals and syphoned water out of the jars.

Leave the pressure canner for 6-8 hours for the pressure to normalise.

12. Remove the rocker

Take off the rocker and leave it for another 10 minute. This ensures the pressure is really back to 0.

13. Remove your jars

Take your jars out of the pot and place them on either a wooden board or a folded towel. This is to avoid giving the jars cold shock which will shatter your jars.

Leave the jars alone for 24 hours or until completely cold.

14. Check your seals

Remove the screw bands and check that the tops of the cans are concave and firmly sealed. If the seals have failed you can reprocess them immediately, or you can store the jar in the fridge to use within the next week.

Are Canned Carrot Mushy?

Canned carrots have the same texture as boiled carrots. If you’ve ever had carrots in soup or as anything where they are cooked in water or broth, then you will know what to expect.

Do You Have to Peel Carrots Before Canning?

I don’t, however it is totally up to you. I barely ever peel any vegetables. 

How Long Will Canned Carrots Last?

Home canned carrots, when properly canned in sterile jars in a pressure canner, should last at least 5 years.

How to pressure can carrots

How to pressure can carrots

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 1 days
Total Time: 1 days 50 minutes

How to pressure can carrots at home the easy way

Ingredients

  • 5lb Fresh raw carrots
  • Clean jars
  • Seals
  • Screw bands
  • Salt
  • Water

Instructions

1. Wash the carrots

Carrots fresh from the garden are best to use. Give them a good scrub and remove any spots or cracks.

2. Cut the carrots

You can decide if you want your carrots sliced or in chunks. Small carrots I tend to leave whole.

3. Pack the carrots in to your canning jars

Pack them in as tightly as you can as they will collapse down slightly once they are cooked.

4. Top with water

Fill the jars allowing 1 inch of head space - the gap at the top. Run a knife around the edge of the jar and release any air bubbles and re-top up with water if required to keep that 1 inch headspace. You might choose to add salt now at the rate of 1/2 teaspoon for a 500ml/pint jar and 1 teaspoon for a 1 liter/1 quart jar.

5. Add the seals and bands

Wipe the rims of the jars, checking for any chips or cracks in both the edge of the jars and on the seals. Damaged jars or damaged seals won't work. 

Screw down the bands with just your fingertips until it is tight.

6. Add water to your canner

Follow your pressure canners directions and add as much water as it suggests. I add 4 liters/quarts to my 23 quart canner.

Place your canner on the cook top and add your jars on top of the rack.

7. Seal on your lid and put on high

Check that your canner lid is in good shape, ensure none of the seals are cracked or need replaced. Place your lid on properly but with the rocker off. Set your canner on high and bring to a boil.

8. Vent for 10 minutes

Once your pot is boiling and there is a constant stream of steam coming out the vent set your timer for 10 minutes.

9. Place your rocker

After 10 minutes place your rocker on and allow the pressure to build.

If you live under 1000ft/303m altitude then you are aiming for 11psi, if you live above this you will have to aim for 15psi, follow your canners directions for altitude adjustments.

10. Set your timer

Once pressure is reached set your timer again - 25 minutes for smaller jars and 30 minutes for the larger jars. Try to keep the pressure at the set amount, for my oven that means I have to turn my cooktop down to halfway.

11. Turn off and walk away

Once your timer goes off, turn your cooktop off and walk away. This allows the pressure to normalise slowly as the temperature declines. If you rush this process you will end up with failed seals and syphoned water out of the jars.

Leave the pressure canner for 6-8 hours for the pressure to normalise.

12. Remove the rocker

Take off the rocker and leave it for another 10 minute. This ensures the pressure is really back to 0.

13. Remove your jars

Take your jars out of the pot and place them on either a wooden board or a folded towel. This is to avoid giving the jars cold shock which will shatter your jars.

Leave the jars alone for 24 hours or until completely cold.

14. Check your seals

Remove the screw bands and check that the tops of the cans are concave and firmly sealed. If the seals have failed you can reprocess them immediately, or you can store the jar in the fridge to use within the next week.

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